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than 400 people in 15 countries. for more on this story, i'm joined by kevin baxter, who covers soccer for the "los angeles times." thanks for joining me. >> thanks for the invitation to speak with you. good evening. >> sreenivasan: kevin, tell me, this is not a large soccer country, the uted states, help us put in perspective how big of a scandal this is. >> well, rob wayne right, the head of europol says it's so large, such a grand scale that it threatens the fabric of the gain. another europol investigator said this is the tip of the iceberg. to give you a little perspective, the international sports wagering market is about $1 trillion -- does $1 trillion of business a year. the asian markets alone, they have more transactions -- sports bets on a daily basis than the new york stock exchange. so it's phenomenal the size of the betting market. now that's everything from you or i going down to our nearby casino and putting $5 down on the super bowl. it goes from there to huge bets on soccer matches. and this is throughout the world. now, with soccer there are 208 national federations
: consistency and dependability. kevin caron with washington crossing advisors will join us. >> susie: and finally tonight, valentine's day is just around the corner, one week from tonight to be exact, and it looks like americans will spend more than ever before on their sweeties, nearly $18 billion. the national retail federation says on average, americans will spend almost $131 on candy, cards, and gifts. that's up from $126 last year. so what are people buying, candy is the first choice, then flowe, and jewelry. and tom, apparently men, more than women, spend more on their spouses when it comes to valentine's day. how but? what is it going to be, candy? >> tom: chocolate. my beautiful woif is the granddaughter of a jeweller and is a leveragic to flowers so i have to right to the top of the list and go for the candy. >> susie: not a bad thing, at least are you getting her something. that is important, that is nightly business report for thursday february 7th. have a great evening, see you tomorrow. >> tom: you too, susie. have a great night, more on-line, nbr.comeback on the broadca
: at the gathering of gop luminaries: top conservative congressmeeric cantor, kevin mccarthy, paul ryan, senate power brokers jim demint, jon kyl, tom coburn, and event organizer frank luntz. >> the room was filled. it was a who's who of ranking members who had at one point been committee chairmen or in the majority, who now wondered, out loud, whether they were in the permanent minority >> the 44th president of these united states, barack obama. >> many of them had attended obama's inauguration. they had seen that breathtaking spectacle of a million and a half people on the mall. and it felt like a wholesale repudiation of the republican party. >> they walked into that dining room as depressed as i've seen any elected members of congress. they lost every senate seat they could lose. they lost all these house seats. the numbers were so great that they thought that they weren't coming back again, not for an election or two, but maybe a generationr two. >> narrator: as the night wore on, the talk turned to the future. >> three hours, some of the brightest minds in the republican party debated how to be
. >> well, look, the leading scientists, jim hanson, for example, kevin trendberg, for example, others have pointed out that this whole rhetorical debate about whether you can have a single cause and a single affect or whether there is a systemic causation, here's the systemic causation, that links climate change to superstorm sandy. the fact is, we're putting 90 million tons of global warming pollution io the earth's atmosphere every day as if it is an open sewer. it traps heat, it obeys the laws of fisks. the amount of extra heap trapped each day is equivalent to the energy released by 400,000 hiroshima atomic bombs every day. that's a lot of energy, even on a big planet. and one of the things that does is it evaporates more water off the oceans which puts more water vapor into the sky, 4% more in the last 30 years, and then when that waterfalls, either as rain or snow, it comes in much larger downpours, which causes larger floods. the winds get stronger. the storm, the storms are more intense, the sea level is up. all those things converged on sandy. but the very fact that there is 4% mo
, who was head of enforcement for the sec. we met with a senior deputy in the fbi, kevin perkins. >> we sat down, and we sort of got down to business, and ted said, "chairman leahy has asked me to hold an oversight hearing that will provide me with a public forum to explore, you knowjusthat you'reoing on this front of investigating wall street." well, that certainly got their attention. >> they started telling me about this great thing they had out in california, this web to catch the mortgage brokers who had given out the loans. and we made it clear to them, i made it clear to them, that absolutely positively i don't-- i'm not-- this is not about l.a. this is totally about what went on on wall street. that's what the bill says and that's what the emphasis is. >> we said, you know, "don't just come back here a couple of years from now and say, you know, 'look at all the small fry we nailed to the wall.' you know, we're talking about also iestigating senior-leve people at wall street firms, even at the board level." >> i think we might have been a little bit concerned at this meeting tha
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)